Trump's Transgender Policy and Its Fashionable Enemies

How is this different than being rejected for any other reason?

Martin Cothran | July 27, 2017

How is this different than being rejected for any other reason?
Trump's Transgender Policy and Its Fashionable Enemies

The cultural revolutionaries are up in arms over President Trump's new policy on the admittance of transgendered people in the military.

Now the first thing to point out is that there are a lot of things that can result in the military not accepting you. They can reject you because you are too tall; because you are too short; because you are too thin; because you are too fat; because you are too young; or because you are too old. Or because you can't see or hear well.

You can even be rejected because you are gluten intolerant. Or because you have braces.

None of these categories of people ever complain about being discriminated against. No one talks about fat-shaming when he is rejected because he weighs 300 pounds.

But if you are rejected from the military because you are "transgender," then you are being discriminated against. Why? How is this different than being rejected for any other reason?

The answer is this: Because transgendered people are a favored political class. And the decision by the Obama administration to force the military to accept transgender people was a political, not a military one.

Far from being discriminated against or disfavored in society, if you are gay or transgendered, you get bonus points. You are applauded, celebrated, encouraged. Virtually every sector of popular and corporate culture, academia, and government is on the sexual revolution bandwagon.

When was the last time you heard of someone "coming out" in some public forum and getting booed?

The military can basically reject people for any reason they want--unless it violates some politically correct dogma. And in the case of the transgender issue, we have the politically correct dogma par excellence.

Now, those who have been rejected for other reasons could make some of the same arguments as we are now hearing from transgender advocates. A gluten intolerant person could just as easily say that they could perform their military job just as well as anyone else. And they would be right.

But, of course, that is not the point. The point is not whether a particular person could serve a particular role well. The point is what the military is going to have to do to accommodate you.

Military meals are not exactly fine cuisine and there is very little variety in the mess hall. To have to have separate culinary accommodations for the gluten-intolerant among us is a distraction they don't need.

Likewise, the admission of transgendered people (or gays for that matter) brings about all kinds of questions in regard to facilities use, not to mention sexual harassment issues, of which there are already too many.

And then there are all the issues involved in unit cohesion.

But if you're a politically favored class, you don't have to meet the same standards, and you get to help rewrite the rules.

Funny how that works.

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[Image Credit: Popkey]



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