Blog

The College Board recently released its new AP U.S. History (APUSH) Curriculum Framework. It is, in many respects, a dispiriting document. A great deal of important U.S. history is given cursory treatment and some ideological themes are sounded...

Posted by: Peter Wood on July 21, 2014

For most people politics looks like a game about who is up or down. Sometimes established favorites win big. Other times long-shots burst forth and upset the established order. The horse race tends to most capture public...

Posted by: Doug Bandow on July 18, 2014

While recuperating from a knee and shoulder injury, I used my forced idleness to read two very different English writers: the eighteenth-century historian Edward Gibbon and the twentieth-century mystery novelist John Buchan. Despite the gravity...

Posted by: Mark G. Malvasi on July 17, 2014

Among its many advantages, marriage is a potent antipoverty strategy.

Perhaps the most cited study on the economics of divorce is Jay Zagorsky’s 2005 “Marriage and...

Posted by: Wendy McElroy on July 11, 2014

A British nanny made some waves this week with her article “5 Reasons Modern-Day Parenting is in Crisis”....

Posted by: Devin Foley on July 11, 2014

Recent stories concerning the sorry state of American education have focused on problems with the new “Common Core” public school curriculum and retention of clearly incompetent teachers. As a parent who long ago rejected our public school system...

Posted by: Bruce Frohnen on July 9, 2014

On May 1, the U.S. Mint released the latest of its presidential commemorative dollar coins, this one celebrating our famously taciturn 30th president, Calvin Coolidge. Actually, Silent Cal wasn't all that silent. He minted his public speaking...

Posted by: Peter Wood on July 8, 2014

Quickly bored with beach vacations, I ventured off last summer to Belize not only to snorkel with the fishes and down a few rum punches, but also to explore Mayan ruins. The Mayans built their great pyramids in that part of Central America...

Posted by: Dwight Longenecker on June 10, 2014

We live in the I-can-always-look-it-up era. One consequence: not much need to memorize.

Actually, forgetting to memorize was in vogue long before Google, Wikipedia, and the galaxy of search tools and near-universal online libraries we all...

Posted by: Peter Wood on June 9, 2014

On the 70th anniversary of D-Day, it seems fitting to mention that I have this picture in my office:...

Posted by: Devin Foley on June 6, 2014