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Mark Zuckerberg, CEO and founder of Facebook, made an announcement in January that he was launching a book club. He is calling 2015 “A Year of Books,” and he has invited Facebook users to join him in discussions and participate in author Q&As...

Posted by: Christopher Nelson on March 6, 2015

"US Uncut" founder Carl Gibson is known for creating shocking, if dubious, viral memes about the economy.

On the progressive group’s Facebook page,...

Posted by: Corey Iacono and Matt Palumbo on March 5, 2015

Never has the stock market soared higher nor the supply of affordable books been cheaper. Lucky or cursed, let us examine the latter–about which T.S. Eliot asks a great question but falls short in his reply.

I confess, I adore them. I...

Posted by: Stephen Masty on March 2, 2015

Someone at Buffalo Wild Wings decided to make the costs of the so-called Affordable Care Act (ACA) explicit in the restaurant’s register receipts. An estimated ACA cost of 2 percent was charged to each paying customer.

BW3’s customers...

Posted by: D.W. Mackenzie on February 27, 2015

You remember Homer’s epic similes—those longish, detailed, and often surprising comparisons of rather dissimilar things: helmeted heads to poppy flowers, thigh wounds to stylish harnesses, generals to woodcutters, weeping women to melting...

Posted by: Emily E. Stelzer on February 25, 2015

This year’s Valentine’s Day was disastrous — not just for...

Posted by: Julian Adorney on February 23, 2015

Can you imagine a Roman republican, reborn, walking the streets of Philadelphia in 1776? Or how about Lexington in 1775? Or perhaps Boston in 1765? What would he think of the American fondness for Rome and her republicanism? What would the...

Posted by: Bradley J. Birzer on February 20, 2015

In his “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” Martin Luther King Jr. identifies the government as the enemy of the rights and dignity of blacks. He was locked up for...

Posted by: Jeffrey A. Tucker on February 18, 2015

During England’s darkest days of World War II, hope emerged from an unlikely source. An Oxford don–a professor of English literature, who would later be best known for a seven-part children’s fantasy series–gave frequent public addresses to the...

Posted by: Bradley J. Birzer on February 13, 2015

Chances are you’ve seen an...

Posted by: Annie Holmquist on February 9, 2015