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Franken, Weinstein, and 'Men Without Chests'

1 ½ min

Since the news of Harvey Weinstein broke, there has been a constant drip of revelations about famous men doing terrible things. This time, Sen. Al Franken and, perhaps, Sylvester Stallone have fallen. In the case of Sen. Franken, there is damning photographic evidence and a history of questionable jokes and activities.

The current wave of allegations of sexual misconduct is sadly quite predictable. For many decades now, we have mocked the gentleman and rewarded the narcissist. Is it any wonder then that there seems to be a dearth of good men in high places?

Not long ago, various entertainers, politicians, media stars, and Twitterati mocked Vice President Mike Pence for his rule of not dining alone with a woman. Here are some examples:

Mike Pence Twitter dinner woman

Mike Pence dinner woman twitter

Mike pence dinner twitter woman

Mike Pence Twitter dinner

As C.S. Lewis wrote in The Abolition of Man,

And all the time -- such is the tragi-comedy of our situation -- we continue to clamor for those very qualities we are rendering impossible. You can hardly open a periodical without coming across the statement that what our civilization needs is more ‘drive’, or dynamism, or self-sacrifice, or ‘creativity’. In a sort of ghastly simplicity we remove the organ and demand the function. We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful.

Largely the result of Hollywood, we live in a society that glorifies sex and instant gratification while scoffing at the idea of a good man, a gentleman. It’s time we reverse it.

Devin Foley

Devin Foley

Devin is the co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Charlemagne Institute, which operates Intellectual Takeout, Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, and the Alcuin Internship. He is a graduate of Hillsdale College where he studied history and political science. Prior to co-founding Charlemagne Institute, he served as the Director of Development at the Center of the American Experiment, a state-based think tank in Minnesota.

Devin is a contributor to local and national newspapers, a frequent guest on a variety of talk shows, such as Minneapolis' KTLK and NPR's Talk of the Nation, and regularly shares culture and education insights presenting to civic groups, schools, and other organizations. In 2011, he was named a Young Leader by the American Swiss Foundation.

Devin and his wife have been married for eighteen years and have six children. When he's not working, Devin enjoys time with family while also relaxing through reading, horticulture, home projects, and skiing and snowboarding.

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