Jack Trotter

Jack Trotter writes from Charleston, South Carolina.

Latest by Jack Trotter in ITO



Latest by Jack Trotter in Chronicles

  • Under Cover of Darkness
    December 2020

    Under Cover of Darkness

    9 ½ min

    Among all the monuments that have been toppled in our recent iconoclastic mania, the Calhoun Monument is one which stood out as an attack, not so much on a particular man, but on an idea: states’ rights, and the concomitant right of secession.

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  • What the Editors Are Reading: <em>Who Owns America?</em>
    November 30, 2020

    What the Editors Are Reading: Who Owns America?

    3 ¾ min

    Who Owns America? A New Declaration of Independence remains a classic of American political thought and rhetoric. It was intended in part as a sequel to the better-known I’ll Take My Stand

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  • What the Editors Are Reading: November 2020
    November 2020

    What the Editors Are Reading: November 2020

    7 ½ min

    Paul Gottfried reads Aristotle's Politics and Jack Trotter reads the Southern Agrarian manifesto, Who Owns America? A New Declaration of Independence

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  • Plague Literature: The Threshing Floor
    June 2020

    Plague Literature: The Threshing Floor

    11 ¼ min

    Since plague is one of those natural disasters whose origin cannot be assigned to human agency, it can pose seemingly insoluble moral problems…Does God in fact directly will suffering, or does he merely permit it?

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  • Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.
    April/May 2020

    Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.

    17 min

    Two years after the death of the man whom one of his biographers, John Judis, dubbed the patron saint of modern conservatism, Encounter Books brought out a splendidly packaged omnibus volume of his columns and essays, entitled Athwart History: Half a Century of Polemics, Animadversions, and Illuminations (2010). On the cover, William Francis Buckley stands at the helm of a sailing vessel, an American flag flying high behind him, his hair tousled in a stiff wind, and a pair of sunglasses perched jauntily on his prominent nose. His smile can only be described as ebullient, not unlike the smile that we have seen in dozens of photographs of Buckley.

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