Stephen B. Presser

Stephen B. Presser is the legal affairs editor for Chronicles magazine. He is the Raoul Berger Professor of Legal History Emeritus at Northwestern University's Pritzker School of Law and Professor of Business Law Emeritus at the Kellogg School of Management. He is a leading American legal historian and expert on shareholder liability for corporate debts.

Latest by Stephen B. Presser in ITO



Latest by Stephen B. Presser in Chronicles

  • What We Are Reading: October 2021
    October 2021

    What We Are Reading: October 2021

    4 min

    John Greenville and Stephen Presser discuss the enduring relevance of several classics: Sinclair Lewis' Babbitt, William Makepeace Thackeray's Vanity Fair, and Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady.

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  • The Surveillance State Turns Twenty
    September 2021

    The Surveillance State Turns Twenty

    12 ½ min

    An oppressive surveillance state has grown up amid the ruins of America's constitutional and legal structure. Without civic virtue and popular sovereignty, restraints on arbitrary power have weakened.

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  • What We Are Reading: <em>Milo Chronicles</em>
    July 9, 2021

    What We Are Reading: Milo Chronicles

    1 ¾ min

    Rachel Fulton Brown took Milo Yiannopoulos seriously when no one else did, and her book on her friendship with the provocateur serves as a manual for isolated conservative academics.

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  • What We Are Reading: July 2021
    July 2021

    What We Are Reading: July 2021

    4 min

    Chronicles Legal Affairs Editor Stephen B. Presser reads Rachel Fulton Brown’s Milo Chronicles, and Alexander Riley reads Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men.

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  • The Unfashionable Adams Legacy
    June 2021

    The Unfashionable Adams Legacy

    7 ½ min

    John Adams was the most intellectual of the Founding Fathers and yet is the least fashionable today. A new biography by R. B. Bernstein shows that Adams’ personal flaws and lack of finesse pale in comparison to his rich legacy of constitutional law.

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