Joseph Pearce

Joseph Pearce is Senior Contributor at The Imaginative Conservative. A native of England, Mr. Pearce is Director of Book Publishing at the Augustine Institute, editor of the St. Austin Review, editor of Faith & Culture, and series editor of the Ignatius Critical Editions. He is the author of numerous books, which include The Quest for ShakespeareTolkien: Man and MythThe Unmasking of Oscar WildeC. S. Lewis and The Catholic ChurchLiterary ConvertsWisdom and Innocence: A Life of G.K. ChestertonSolzhenitsyn: A Soul in Exile and Old Thunder: A Life of Hilaire Belloc.

Recent blog posts by this author

Are Women the Biggest Losers in the ‘Selfie Culture’?

Latest data published in Britain suggests that young women are at the “highest mental health risk” in our culture. Statistics published by Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) indicate that one in four young women suffer from mental health...

Is Technology Addiction the New Barbarism?

I have often been called a Luddite. It’s not a very nice word and it’s not a very nice thing to be called. For those who have no idea what the word means, the original Luddites were workers during the early years of the  Industrial Revolution...

What Most People Don't Understand About Love

All the problems of the world could be solved if we simply remember that all we need is love. Love! Love is all we need. Is it as simple as John Lennon suggests in his iconic Beatles anthem? The answer is yes. Emphatically, yes...

Why the Liberal Arts (Sadly) Are Becoming Meaningless

Steven Pearlstein, in a recent article for the Washington Post, complained that modern parents were preventing their children from majoring in the liberal arts for fear that those who study history, literature or philosophy would have less chance of...

Why Modern Education is Doomed to Die

One of the great transitions in education in the past fifty years has been the increased emphasis on the so-called STEM subjects – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – and a corresponding diminishing of the place of the traditional...

When Finance and Philosophy Clash

Few people in our materialistic and avaricious age would consider making money a moral issue. Isn’t it merely one of the bare necessities of life? We speak of a “healthy profit” but nobody speaks about an unhealthy profit. To do so would be absurd,...

UK Report: One in Four Adults 'Struggle to Read Bus Timetable'

In 1927, G. K. Chesterton gave a talk at University College, London, on the topic of “Culture and the Coming Peril”. It was one of the best talks he ever gave and one of the most prophetic. He began by addressing the expectation of many in his...

Why is the Influence of Literary and Religious Figures Often Overlooked by Historians?

In my last article, I lambasted the historians at National Geographic for their bias in the list of “the most influential figures of ancient history.” I asked why they favored secular rulers whose “influence” consisted of brute force and...

National Geographic: Jesus Not an Influential Figure of the Ancient World

In a dumbed-down culture we are often happy to take any scraps of intellectual comfort we can find. In such an impoverished climate, a magazine like National Geographic takes on almost iconic significance. We are tempted to see it as a last bastion...

Restoring the Four Pillars of Education

Few would argue that modern education is in crisis. Evidence suggests our system creates moral nihilists; professors admit they are teaching students who “know hardly anything about anything at all.” So what is to be done? If...

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