Stephen Klugewicz

Stephen Klugewicz is editor of The Imaginative Conservative. He holds a Ph.D. in American History, with expertise in the eras of the Founding and Early Republic. Dr. Klugewicz is the co-editor of History, on Proper Principles: Essays in Honor of Forrest McDonald and Founders and the Constitution: In Their Own Words. He is the former executive director of the Collegiate Network at ISI and of the Robert and Marie Hansen Foundation and has long experience in education, having been president of Franklin’s Opus, director of education at the National Constitution Center, and headmaster of Regina Luminis Academy.

Recent blog posts by this author

Why Mike Rowe’s Newest Show Is an Antidote to Our Toxic Culture

Edmund Burke famously said in his Reflections on the Revolution in France: “To be attached to the subdivision, to love the little platoon we belong to in society, is the first principle (the germ as it were) of public affections.” Burke’s assertion...

The Decline of Western Civilization in 10 Pictures

Without any ado, here are ten pictures that convey how far Western Civilization has fallen over the last centuries. 1. Mozart conducting one of his own settings of the Mass, circa 1780; modern church service with rock band...

10 Weird Facts on the Lincoln Assassination

The assassination of Abraham Lincoln on Good Friday, April 14, 1865 at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C., is one of the most dramatic and famous events of American history. Yet beyond the familiar, basic facts of the story, there are many...

What Did That Confederate Statue in Durham Stand For?

As I watched a crowd of militant Leftists in Durham, North Carolina this week pull down a statue of a Confederate soldier, I was left not only angry but befuddled by the ignorance of it all: the vitriol of the mob focused on this seemingly...

Music for Easter & Holy Week: Ten Classical Pieces

Though Handel’s Messiah rightly reigns supreme as the king of music for Easter, there are many other seasonal masterpieces that deserve to be heard more often. Here are ten lesser-known classical works that brilliantly depict the dramatic events of...

The American Republic and the Long Shadow of Rome

“Beware the Ides of March!” Thus the soothsayer warned Emperor Julius Caesar on the 15th of March, 44 B.C. On that day, Caesar, who had overturned the Roman republic and made himself a tyrant, was assassinated by a group of Senators, including his...